Adding DNS Records in Pressable

Last modified: September 25, 2020

Overview

When your domain name is pointed to us via nameservers, your DNS is managed through Pressable. We have a customer-facing DNS editor found in your MyPressable Control Panel, which is accessed by clicking on the blue gear icon to the right of your domain.

Getting Started

    • Navigate to MyPressable
    • Click the “Settings” button for your site, e.g. https://my.pressable.com/sites/SITEID
    • Navigate to the “Domains” section, and click the blue settings icon for the domain you wish to modify.

Modifying DNS Entries

Clicking the “Settings” button will toggle open the DNS editor, allowing you to add and manage your own custom DNS records.

Please be careful when making DNS changes. These records can affect the availability of your domain and email.

By default, when adding a domain to your Pressable account it will automatically be assigned the required A record IP addresses as well as a TXT record. These are necessary and should be left in place. The only time you would want to change these default A record IPs is if you want to point your domain away from Pressable.

To add a new record, simply select the record type and enter the details. Records can be removed by clicking on the trash icon to the right.

Below we will cover the most common DNS record types and how those are added.

A Records

A records are DNS records that point your domain, or subdomain, to a specific server IP address. They consist of the following:

  • Name: the host name for the record, generally referred to as the subdomain. www is an example of this. Leave blank to apply to the root domain.
  • IP Address: the IP that the domain or subdomain should direct to
  • TTL: The time-to-live in seconds. This is the amount of time the record is allowed to be cached by a resolver. The lower the number, the faster the change will go through. 3600 is one hour.

MX Records

MX (Mail Exchange) records are DNS records that specify what mail server is responsible for accepting mail on behalf of your domain. Simply put, they allow your domain to receive email through an email service provider. They consist of the following:

  • Name: the host name for the record. This is often left blank.
  • Server: the URL provided by the email service provider.
  • MX Level: the priority for the record. The lower the number, the higher the priority.
  • TTL: The time-to-live in seconds. This is the amount of time the record is allowed to be cached by a resolver. The lower the number, the faster the change will go through. 3600 is one hour.

Often you will have more than one MX record for a given email mail service provider.

Please note: Often the server value needs to end in a period. For example:

ASPMX.L.GOOGLE.COM.

CNAME Records

CNAME records are a type of DNS record that can map one domain to another domain. They are similar to A records in that you are pointing a domain (or subdomain) to a different location. Only A records point to an IP address, while CNAME records point to a URL.

An example of this would be if you wanted to launch your Gmail account when you went to mail.yourdomain.com. You would create a new CNAME record, enter mail in the name field, and ghs.googlehosted.com. in the Alias To field.

A CNAME record consists of the following:

  • Name: the subdomain that you are pointing
  • Alias To: the URL that the subdomain is pointing to
  • TTL: The time-to-live in seconds. This is the amount of time the record is allowed to be cached by a resolver. The lower the number, the faster the change will go through. 3600 is one hour.

Please note: often the Alias to value needs to end in a period for example:

ghs.googlehosted.com.

TXT Records

TXT records are DNS records that are commonly used for domain verification, email security (SPF and DKIM), and for other arbitrary purposes. They are simple to implement. TXT records consist of the following:

  • Name: often left blank
  • Value: the TXT record to be entered
  • TTL: The time-to-live in seconds. This is the amount of time the record is allowed to be cached by a resolver. The lower the number, the faster the change will go through. 3600 is one hour.

SRV Records

An SRV is a service record that defines the location of servers for specific services. Most often used for certain email service providers. They include:

  • Name
  • Value
  • TTL
  • Priority
  • Weight
  • Port

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